This Was the Average Day For An Ancient Roman Soldier

    How would you have fared? 

    Today, the modern soldier wakes up, eats chow, goes through a day of training with his or her squad before resting up. They follow this schedule every day from Monday to Friday. If the troop is on a deployment, they could work anywhere from 12 to 18 hours (if not more) per day, seven days a week, for nearly a year.

    It's a tough lifestyle.

    Once a troop fulfills their service commitment, they can be honorably discharged or reenlist—the choice is theirs.

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    Now, let's rewind time to around 15 C.E. The Roman Empire is thriving and you're an infantryman serving in the Imperial Roman army under Emperor Tiberius. In many ways, life was quite different for the average sword-wielding soldier when compared to today's modern troop. In other ways, however, things were very much the same.

    roman soldier

    A sword and spears are usually a part of a Roman soldier's attire.

    Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

    Many young Romans joined the army at the age of 18. Of them, most were poor men with little-to-no life prospects due to being born into a family of low standing. Once they became soldiers, Roman troops had to overcome 36 kilometer (22 miles) marches in full battle rattle.

    For these ancient troops, a full loadout consisted of body armor, a gladius (sword), a scutum (shield), and two pilum (spears). This gear weighed upwards of 44 pounds. To add to that weight, troops carried a scarina (backpack), which contained rations and any other tools needed to serve the Roman officers.

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    At the end of each grueling march, soldiers set up camp to get some rest. Men were assigned to stand watch and look over the others, the gear, and the animals hauling the heavy equipment. Being ambushed in the middle of the night was a constant possibility.

    Like most troops, they feared the unknown. At any given moment, they could encounter a fierce battle, contract sickness from other soldiers or the environment, or be left to endure the elements. It was a consist struggle to survive in a cutthroat world that was all about expanding the Roman Empire.

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    In their downtime, most men would gamble, play instruments, or talk about future plans. If the soldiers served for their full 25-year commitment, they would receive several acres of land on which to retire—but surviving to the end was considered a longshot.

    So, in many ways, the typical Roman infantryman was a lot like the ground pounders of today—only they were stuck in the suck for longer.

    Created on 09 Jan 2019

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