• search-icon

9 Little-Known Facts About the History of Memorial Day

Trace the history of America's national day of remembrance. 

Although we commemorate Memorial Day each year, the holiday’s origins are rarely discussed. Many countries, especially those that were involved in World War II, have their own iteration of the monument to the soldiers who dedicated their lives to their country’s cause. From its earliest version as Decoration Day, Memorial Day has been a part of an important, reflective moment in the United States. Trace the history of the holiday from its earliest incarnation to the major occasion it is today with these little-known Memorial Day facts.

1. Memorial Day began as a day honoring Union soldiers killed during the Civil War.

memorial day
  • Aftermath of the Civil War

  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

After the end of the Civil War, General John A. Logan became the Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, a group of Union veterans. Logan issued a General Order declaring May 30 as Memorial Day for fallen Union soldiers. For the first years of celebration, Memorial Day and Decoration Day were used interchangeably to refer to the day. 

Related: 12 Essential Civil War Books 

2. Some Southern states still have a separate day of remembrance for Confederate soldiers.

memorial day
  • Presidents of Ladies Memorial Association.

  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Not long after the Grand Army of the Republic established Memorial Day, Confederate groups organized to create their own commemorative holiday. Although a number of women’s groups, primarily the Ladies Memorial Association, had started to organize day outings to tidy graves and leave flowers, a larger movement began in 1868. By 1890, there was a specific focus on commemorating the Confederacy as well as the soldiers lost. Today, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina continue to celebrate a separate day for the fallen soldiers of the Confederacy.

Related: 18 Important Women in History You May Not Have Heard of 

3. The original date of ‘Decoration Day’ was May 30, chosen because it was not associated with any particular battle.

memorial day
  • 1870 Decoration Day parade in St. Paul, Minnesota.

  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

General Logan chose the date of the original Memorial Day with great care. May 30 was chosen precisely because no major battle occurred on that day. Afraid that choosing a date associated with a major battle like Gettysburg would be perceived as casting soldiers in that battle as more important than other comrades, May 30 was a neutral date that would honor all soldiers equally.

4. The tradition of red poppies honoring fallen soldiers comes from a Canadian poem written during WWI.

memorial day
  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Although the wearing of red poppies to honor fallen soldiers is more popular in the United Kingdom and throughout the former British empire, poppies are also associated with Memorial Day in the United States. This tradition was started after Moina Michael, a young poet, was inspired by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae’s poem “In Flanders Fields”. The opening lines read, “In Flanders field the poppies blow/Between the crosses, row on row”. The imagery moved Moina, and she decided to wear a red poppy as a symbol of her continued remembrance of those who fought in World War I.

5. The Vietnam War was responsible for Memorial Day becoming a national holiday.

memorial day
  • A wounded solider being carried away during the Vietnam War in 1968.

  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Memorial Day was celebrated regularly across the United States from the mid-1800s on—while it nearly ceased in the early 20th century, the world wars made its commemoration important once more. Yet Memorial Day was not federally recognized until the height of the Vietnam War. In 1968, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved a number of holidays to a Monday rather than their original day, including Memorial Day, Labor Day, and Veterans Day. In 1971, the Act took effect, making each holiday federally recognized and giving workers additional three-day weekend—in part thanks to the lobbying efforts of the travel industry.

Related: The 9 Best Vietnam War Movies 

6. Rolling Thunder, a nonprofit that brings attention to prisoners of war and those who remain missing in action, holds a rally every Memorial Day.

memorial day
  • The annual ride by Rolling Thunder as it crosses the Memorial Bridge in Washington D.C.

  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

In 1987, a group of veterans visited the Vietnam Memorial in D.C. While there, they realized just how pervasive the issue of missing Vietnam soldiers was. The status of over 1,000 soldiers remains unknown to this day. In the ‘80s, as many as 2,700 soldiers’ fates were unknown. The men decided to organize a motorcycle rally the day before Memorial Day, hoping to create enough noise—both literal and figurative—that political groups would be forced to pay attention. Since the outset of their rally, an additional 1,100 unknown soldiers have been identified or discovered.

7. Although many towns claim to have been the birthplace of Memorial Day, Waterloo, New York is officially recognized as the first to commemorate the day.

memorial day
  • Waterloo Downtown Historic District

  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

General Logan may have made the first call for a national Memorial Day, but, as discussed earlier, it was far from the only day of remembrance. As early as 1866, people throughout the North and South gathered to memorialize fallen soldiers. Waterloo, New York was one of many towns to have a city-wide commemoration of those lost in the war. And while over two dozen towns and cities claim to be the first to have celebrated this day of remembrance, in 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared Waterloo, New York the official birthplace of Memorial Day—in part because it was the only town to have consistently memorialized the day since its inception.

8. Congress passed a law in 2000 that requires Americans to stop what they're doing at 3:00 P.M. to observe the holiday.

memorial-day-facts
  • Photo Credit: United States Department of Defense

It’s actually required by law for Americans to honor fallen troops at 3:00 P.M. local time on Memorial Day. Known as The National Moment of Remembrance Act, this law asks that Americans take a moment of silence to pay tribute to the troops who have given their lives for the country. Various organizations throughout the country observe this moment in their own unique way. Major league baseball games pause and ask audiences to take a moment of silence, and almost 200 Amtrak trains use their whistles in accordance to the law. 

Related: The Best History Book Deals of the Month 

9. American flags are requested to be flown half-staff until noon on Memorial Day.

half-staff-flag-memorial-day-facts
  • Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

On Memorial Day, federal buildings that have a flag pole are asked every year by the President to fly the American flag at half staff from sunrise to noon. This means that the flag should be kept at the midpoint of the pole—in honor of the country’s fallen troops. Once noon passes, the flag can be brought all the way to the top. Citizens who also own a flag pole are also encouraged to do the same.

Featured photo: Wikimedia Commons 

Published on 24 May 2018

scroll up